The First William Peskett Short Story Omnibus

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This wonderful collection of essays about topics in biology and neuroscience was first published in the early s. Several titles are free on the US Amazon store, including this one. This recent Breakthrough Novel Award winner is about a talented but ragtag baseball team who set out to change the world during the Great Depression. Ray vs. This won a Booklife prize also. Reilly died prematurely before publishing anything major. I got Circumstantial Man for Free! I started reading Book 1 and enjoyed the humor and atmosphere.

Reilly is really a first class writer and you should be on the lookout for specials on his other volumes. First William Peskett Story Omnibus. Peskett is a prolific Irish author and poet now living in Thailand. I started reading these stories: interesting, mundane, plot-oriented. Various ebooks by Jessica Barksdale Inclan.

A major talent…. I went ahead and paid full price 1. Waco Variations by Rhonda Rizzo. Story about a musician affected by the Branch Davidian fiasco who turns her life around and discovers music. A collection of tales of ghosts and the macabre…. Humorous sci fi. Fast Philosophy: Whizz to wisdom in hilarious, short mental workouts perfect for commutes, bathroom breaks, and lazy afternoons on the couch By: Adam Fletcher.

Ok, this makes me squeamish, but it sounds useful! Only a page monograph, not in depth, but Wood is a distinguished film critic. Apparently famous only novel published by 70 year old British civil servant. Diary of a nobody, sort of an homage to Joseph Heller his favorite author but one critic notes that the tone sounds like Philip Larkin. Out of print book of annotated lists of titles by subjects. Intended to be a resource for book clubs, it actually is fun and brilliant!

Out of the Woods by Chris Offutt. Coincidentally, I almost bought other Offutt titles a few months ago. Monarchy of Fear by Martha C. A brilliant but overpriced 8 dollar ebook by a well-known editor about how to write a commercial fiction title. Mindblowing short stories. V Vaticanus is closely akin to M, but contains only Books I. The text of Book X. While this was still extant at Paris, copies of it by different hands were used by Avantius of Verona for his edition of , and by Aldus in But while the Aldine edition gave the tenth Book entire, the fii'st forty Letters are for some reason missing in that of Avantius.

Plinius Secundus Septicio Suo S. Collegi non servato temporis ordine neque enim historian! Quia tardiorem adventum tuura prospicio, librum, quem prioribus epistulis promiseram, exhibeo. I have accordingly done so ; not indeed in their proper order of time, for I was not compiling a history ; but just as they presented themselves to my hands. And now what remains but to wish that neither you may have occasion to repent of your advice, nor I of my compliance? II To Arrianus I FORESEE your journey hither is likely to be delayed, and therefore produce a copy of the speech which 1 promised in my former letter, begging you would, as usual, revise and correct it.

Temptavi enim imitari Demosthenein semper tuum, Calvum nuper meum, dumtaxat figuris orationis ; nam vim tantorum virorum ' pauci, quos aequus amavit,' adsequi possunt.


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Nee materia ipsa huic vereor, ne iinprobe dicani aemulationi repiig- navit ; erat enim prope iota in contentione dicendi ; quod me longae desidiae indormientem excitavit, si modo is sum ego, qui excitari possim. Non tamen omnino Marci nostri XrjKvOovi fugimus, quotiens paulu- lum itinere decedere non intempestivis amoenitatibus admonebamur. Acres enim esse, non tristes, vole- bamus. Nee est, quod putes me sub hae exceptione veniam postulare. Immo, quo magis intendam limam tuam, confitebor et ipsum me et eontubernales ab editione non abhorrere, si modo tu fortasse errori nostro album calculum adieceris.

Est enim plane aliquid edendum, atque utinam hoc potissimum, quod paratum est! Sed sane blandiantur, dum per hoc mendacium nobis studia nostra commendent. BOOK I. When I say so, I mean only with respect to their manner ; for to catch their sublime spii-it, is given alone to "the choice selected few, whom fav'ring Jove befriends. I would not have you imagine that I am bespeaking your indulgence, by filing this counter-plea : on the contrary, to induce you to exercise the utmost severity of your criticism, I will confess, that neither my famiUars nor myself are averse to the publication of this piece if you should give your vote in favour of what may be pure error on my part.

The truth is, as I must publish something, I wish do you catch the true sluggard's petition? At all events, however, some- thing I must publish, and for many reasons ; chiefly, because the speeches Avhich I have already sent into the world, though they have long since lost all their recommendation from novelty, are still, I am told, in request ; if, after all, the Booksellers do not flatter me. And let 'em, since by that deception I am encouraged to pursue my studies.

Plinius Caninio Rufo Suo S. Quid agit Comum, tuae meaeque deliciae? Possidentne te, et per vices parti- untur? Si te possi- R dent, felix beatusque es ; si minus, unus ex multis. Quin tu tempus est enim humiles et sordidas curas aliis mandas et ipse te in alto isto pinguique secessu studiis adseris? Hoc sit negotium tuum, hoc otium, hie labor, haec quies, in his vigilia, in his etiam somnus reponatur. Effinge aliquid et excude, quod sit perpetuo tuum. Nam reliqua rerum tuarum post te alium atque alium dominum sortientur : hoc num- quam tuum desinet esse, si semel coeperit.

Scio, quem animum, quod horter ingenium ; tu modo enitere, ut tibi ipse sis tanti, quanti videberis aliis, si tibi fueris. What becomes of the pleasant Villa, the ever vernal Portico, the shady Planetree-grove, the crystal Canal so agreeably winding along its flowery banks, together with the charming Lake below, that serves at once the purposes of use and beauty? What have you to tell me of the firm yet springy Allee, the Bath exposed on all sides to full sun- shine, the public Saloon, the private Dining room, and all the elegant apartments for repose both at noon and night? Do these enjoy my friend, and divide his time with pleasing vicissitude?

Or does the attentive management of your property, as usual, call you frequently out from this agreeable retreat? Let these employ your idle as well as busy hours ; let them be at once your toil and your amusement, the subjects of your waking and even sleeping thoughts : shape and fashion something that shall be really and for ever your own. All your other possessions will pass on from one master to another : this alone, when once it is yours, will for ever be so.

As well I know the temper and genius of him whom I am exhorting, I bid you strive to do justice to your talents ; no more is needed, for the world to do the same. Plinius Pompeiae Celerinae Socrui S. Non niehercule tam mea sunt, quae mea sunt, quam quae tua ; hoc tamen differunt, quod sollicitius et intentius tui me quam mei excipiunt. Idem fortasse eveniet tibi, si quando in nostra deverteris. Quod velira facias, primum ut perinde nostris i-ebus ac nos tuis perfruaris, deinde ut mei expergiscantur aliquando, qui me secure ac prope negligenter exspectant.

Nam mitium dom- inorum apud servos ipsa consuetudine metus exolescit ; novitatibus excitantur probarique dominis per alios magis quam per ipsos laborant. Plinius Voconio Romano Suo S. The elegant accommodations which are to be found at Narnia, Ocriculum, Carsola, Perusiaj particularly the pi-etty bath at Narnia, I am extremely well acquainted with.

For the truth is, I am more the master in your houses than I am in my own, and I know of no other difference betw-een them, than that I am more carefully attended in the former than the latter. You may, perhaps, have occasion to make the same observation in your turn, whenever you shall give me your company here ; which I wish for, not only that you may partake of mine with the same ease and freedom that I doyoiirs, but to awaken the industry of my domestics, who are grown something careless in their attendance upon me.

A long course of mild treatment is apt to wear out the impressions of awe in servants ; whereas new faces quicken their diligence, as they are generally more inclined to please their master by attention to his guests, than to himself. Coepit vereri, ne sibi irascerer ; nee falle- batur ; irascebar.

Lacerat Herennium Senecionem tarn intemperanter quidem, ut dixerit ei Mettius Carus ' Quid tibi cum meis mortuis? Haec me Regulus dolenter tulisse credebat ideoque etiam cum recitaret librum, non adhibuerat. Prae- terea reminiscebatur, quam capitaliter ipsum me apud centumviros lacessisset. Nite- bamur nos in parte causae sententia Metti Modesti, optimi viri.

Is tunc in exsilio erat, a Domitiano relegatus. See Biogr. By Pliny's time it had been enlarged to members, divided into four panels which sat separately for common cases, but as a single court for specially important ones i. It sat in the Basilica Julia ii. He has lately entertained some apprehen- sions of my resentment: they were justly founded ; resentment was what I felt. He falls so furiously in this piece, upon the character of Herennius Senecio, that Mettius Carus said to him one day : " Pray what business have you with my dead men?

Did I ever interfere in the affair of Crassus, or Camerinus? For these reasons he imagines I am highly exas- perated, and therefore even when he recited the piece, did not give me an invitation. Besides he has not forgot, it seems, the dangerous assault he once made upon me, when he and I were pleading before the Centumviri. In the course of my defence I strongly insisted upon a niling which had been formerly given by the worthy Modestus, at that time banished by Domitian.

Now you shall see Regulus in his true colours : " Pray," says he, " what are your sentiments of Modestus? But some guardian power, I cannot but affirm, assisted me in this emergency. Nunc ergo conscientia exter- ritus apprehendit Caecilium Celerem, mox Fabium lustum, rogat, ut me sibi reconcilient, nee contentus pervenit ad Spurinnam ; huic suppliciter ut est, cum timet, abiectissimus ' Rogo,' inquit, 'mane videas Plinium domi : sed plane mane neque enini diutius ferre sollicitudinem possum , et quoquo modo efficias, ne mihi irascatur.

Nuntius a Spurin- na, ' Venio ad te. Exponit Reguli mandata ; addit preces suas, ut dece- " To say that Modestus was loyal, might have beeu con- strued as treason to Domitian, who had condemned liim. Pliny turns the tables upon Regulus by suggesting that even to put a question on a chose jug6e was disloyal to the Emperor. V were a matter for the consideration of the Cen- tumviri.

I replied, " It had been customary to examine witnesses to the character of accused but not of condemned persons. And lest this should not be sufficient, he has applied also to Spurinna for the same purpose ; to whom he came in the humblest manner for he is the most abject crea- ture living, where he has any thing to fear and says he — " I beg you will call upon Pliny to-morrow morn- ing, and endeavour by any means to soften his resentment, but be sure to go early in the morning, for I can no longer support myself under this anxiety of mind.

I sent word back, I would call upon him ; however, both of us setting out to pay this visit, we met under Livia's Portico. Cui ego, 'Dispicies ipse, quid renuntiandum Regulo putes. Te decipia me non oportet. Nam stultissimum credo, ad imitandum non optima quaeque proponere. Sed tu, qui huius iudicii meministi, cur illius oblitus es, in quo me interrogasti, quid de Metti Modesti pietate sen- tirem?

Subiunxit " Brother to Arulenus Rusticus.

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V different character, without greatly pressing the thing. I ought not, I told him, to conceal the true state of the case from him, and after I had informed him of that, I would leave it to himself to consider what answer was proper for me to return. But how happens it," continued I, "that you who remember so well what passed at this trial, should have forgot that other, when you pushed me so strongly concerning the loyalty of Modestus. Potest tamen fieri, ut haec concussa labantur ; nam gratia malorum tarn infida est quam ipsi. Verum, ut idem saepius dicam, exspecto Mauricum.

Vir est gravis, prudens, multis experimentis eruditus, et qui futura possit ex praeteritis providere. Mihi et temptandi aliquid et quiescendi illo auctore ratio constabit. Haec tibi scripsi, quia aequum erat te pro amore mutuo non solum omnia mea facta dietaque, verum etiam consilia cognoscere. Plinius Cornelio Tacito Suo S. RiDEBis, et licet rideas. Ego ille, quem nosti, api'os tres et quidem pulcherrimos, cepi. IHere, or here- abouts, our conversation ended; I 'not wishing to continue it, and being desirous to reserve to myself the liberty of acting as I should see proper Avhen Mauricus returns.

It is no easy matter, I well know, to overthrow Regulus ; he is rich, and at the head of a party ; there are many with whom he has credit, and more that are afraid of him ; a sentiment that is often more powerful than love. But after all, ties of this sort are not so strong, but they may be loosened ; for the popularity of a bad man is no more to be depended upon than he is himself.

However to repeat it again , I shall do nothing in this affair till Mauricus retm-ns. He is a man of solid worth and great sagacity, formed upon a long course of experience, and who, from his observa- tions on the past, well knows how to foresee the future. With him for adviser, I shall be able to present good and sufficient reason for either pursuing or dropping this affair. In the meanwhile, I thought I owed this account to the friendship that subsists between us, which gives you an undoubted right to be informed not only of all my sayings and doings, but all my designs.

VI To Cornelius Tacitus Certainly you will laugh and laugh you may when I tell you that your old acquaintance is turned sportsman, and has taken three noble boars. Ipse ; non tamen ut omnino ab inertia mea et quiete discederem. Non estj quod contemnas hoc studendi genus ; mirum est, ut animus agitatione motuque corporis excite- tur; iam undique silvae et solitudo ipsiimque illud silentium, quod venationi datur, magna cogitatio- nis incitamenta sunt.

Proinde, cum venabere, lice- bit auctore me ut panarium et lagunculam sic etiam pugillares feras ; experieris non Dianam ma- gis montibus quam Minervam inerrare. Nam ego quoque simili nutu ac renutu respondere voto tuo possum. However, I indulged at the same time my beloved inactivity, and whilst I sat at my nets, you would have found me, not with spear and dart, but pen and tablets by my side.

Believe me, this manner of studying is not to be despised ; you cannot conceive how greatly exercise contributes to enliven the imagination. Besides the sylvan solitude with which one is surrounded, and the very silence which is observed on these occasions, strongly incline the mind to meditation. For the future therefore let me advise you, whenever you hunt, to take along with you your tablets, as well as your basket and bottle : for be assured you will find Minerva as fond of roaming the hills as Diana. You have even invested me with a sovereignty equal to that which Homer attributes to his mighty Jove : " From heav'n's imperial throne Jove heard his pray'r.

Part he admits, and scatters part in air. Tene- bo ergo hoe temperameiitum, iit ex duubus, quo- rum alterutrum petis, eligam id potius, in quo non solum studio tuo, verum etiam iudicio satisfaeiam. Neque enim tantopere mihi eonsiderandum est, quid vir optimus in praesentia velis, quam quid semper sis probaturus. Paene praeterii, quod minima prae- tereundum fuit, accepisse me caryotas optimas, quae nunc cum ficis et boletis certandum habent. I shall steer therefore in this affair a middle course, and of the alternatives which you propose to me, choose that which will satisfy your judgement, as well as your in- clination.

They are likely to prove very powei'ful rivals to ray favourite figs and morells'. Peropportune mihi redditae sunt litterae tuae, qiiibus flagitabas, ut tibi aliquid ex scriptis meis mitterem, cum ego id ipsum destinassem. Addidisti ergo calcaria sponte currenti pariterque et tibi veniam I'ecusandi laboris et niihi exigendi vere- cundiam sustulisti. Nam nee me timide uti decet eo, quod oblatum est, nee te gravari, quod depopo- scisti. Non est tamen, quod ab homine desidioso aliquid novi operis exspectes.

Petiturus sum enim, ut rursus vaces sermoni, quern apud munieipes meos habui bibliothecam dedicaturus. Memini qui- dem te iam quaedam adnotasse, sed generaliter ; ideo nunc rogo, ut non tantum universitati eius attendaSj verum etiam particulas, qua soles lima, persequaris. Erit enim et post emendationem libe- rum nobis vel publicare vel continere. Quin immo fortasse banc ipsam cunctationem nostram in alter- utram sententiam emendationis ratio deducet, quae aut indignum editione, dum saepius retractat, inve- niet aut dignum, dum id ipsum experitur, efficiet.

Thus you have set spurs to a willing horse ; and at once deprived yourself of excuse in refusing a task, and me'"o"f"S'cruple in requesting it. For 'twould ill become me to hesitate to make use of your offer ; nor must you take the consequence of it with re- luctance. However, you must not expect from a man of indolence any thing new. You have already, I remember, obliged me with some general observations upon this piece : but I now beg of you, not only to take a view of it in the whole, but distinctly to criticise it, with your usual exactness, in all its parts.

When you have corrected it, I shall still be at liberty either to publish or suppress it. The delay in the meantime will be attended with one of these advantages, that while we are deliberating whether it is fit for the public view, a frequent revisal will either make it so, or convince me that it is not. Though indeed the principal difficulty with me concerning the publication of this harangue, does not arise so much from the composition itself, as from the subject, which has something in it, I feai-, that will look like ostentation.

Anceps hie et lubricus locus est, etiam cum illi necessitas lenocinatur. Qua ex causa saepe ipse mecum, nobisne tantum, quidquid est istud, composuisse, an et aliis de- beamus. Ut nobis, admonet illud, quod pleraque, quae sunt agendae rei necessaria, eadem peracta nee utilitatem parem nee gratiam retinent. Ac, ne longius exempla repetamus, quid utilius fuit quam munificentiae rationem etiam stilo prosequi?

Per hoc enim adsequebamur, primum ut honestis cogitationibus immoraremur, deinde ut pulchritu- dinem illarum longiore tractatu pervideremus, pos- tremo ut subitae largitionis comitem paenitentiam caveremus. Nascebatur ex his exercitatio quaedam contemnendae pecuniae. Nam, omnes cum homines ad custqdiam eius natura restrinxerit, nos contra multum ac diu pensitatus amoi liberalitatis com- 24 BOOK I. A dangerous and slippery topic tliis, even when one is allured to it by necessity! For if mankind are not very favourable to panegyric, even when given us by others, how difficult is it for a speaker not to seem tedious when he himself, or his family, is the theme of his discourse.

Virtue, though stripped of all external advantages, is generally the object of envy, but particularly so, when glory is her attendant ; and the world is never so little disposed to wrest and pervert your honest actions, as when they lie unobserved and unapplauded. For these reasons I frequently ask myself, whether I should have composed this harangue, such as it is, merely for my own private use, or with a view also to the public?

The former plan is recommended by the consideration that what may be exceedingly useful and proper in the prosecution of any affair, may lose all its grace and fitness the moment the thing is completed. This method trained me, as it were, to despise money. For while mankind seem to be universally governed by an innate disposition to accumulate wealth, the cultivation of liberal in- clinations in my own breast taught me to free myself 25 THE LETTERS OF PLINY munibiis avaritiae vinculis eximebat, tantoque lauda- bilior munificentia nostra fore videbatur, quod ad illam non impetu quodam, sed consilio traheba- niur.

Acccdebat liis causis, quod non ludos aut gla- diatores, sed annuos sumptus in alimenta ingenuo- rum pollicebamur. Oculorum porro et aurium vo- luptates adeo non egent commendatione, ut non lam inoitari debeant oratione quam reprimi ; ut vero aliquis libenter educationis taedium laborem- que suscipiat, non praemiis modo, verum etiam ex- juisitis adhortationibus impetrandum est.

Sed, ut tunc coiimiunibus magis commodis quam privatae iactantiae studebamus, cum intentionem effectumque muneris nostri vellemus intellegi, ita nunc in ratione edendi veremur, ne forte non 26 BOOK I. I considered, besides, the nature of my design ; I was not engaging myself to endow public o-ames or troupes of gladiators, but to defray the annual expense of maintenance for well-born youths. Furthermore, the pleasures of the eye and eai' are so far from needing recommendation, that oratory should be employed to curb, rather than to pro- mote them.

But to prevail with anyone, to under- take with cheerfulness the disagreeable business of education, it is necessary to employ, not only rewards, but the most artful incitements.


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But as at that time, when I attempted to ex- plain and enforce the design and benefit of my institution, I considered more the general good of my countrymen than any reputation which might arise to myself; so I am apprehensive if I publisli 27 THE T. Praeterea meminimus, quanto maiore animo honestatis fnictus in conscientia quam in fama rc- ponatur.

Sequi enim gloi'ia, non adpeti debet, nee, si casu aliquo non sequatur, idcirco, quod gloriam uon meruit,' minus pulchrum est. Sic, quod magnificum referente alio fuisset, ipso, qui gesserat, recensente vanescit. Homines enim, cum rem destruere non possunt, iactationem eius incessunt. Ita, si silenda feceris, factum ipsum, si laudanda, quod non sileas, ipse culparis. Me vero peculiaris quaedam impedit ratio. Etenim hunc ipsum sermonem non apud populum, sed apud decuriones habui, nee in propatulo, sed in curia.

Vereor ergo, ut sit satis congruens, cum in dicendo adsentationem vulgi adclamationemque defugerim, nunc eadem ilia editione sectari, cumque plebem ipsam, cui consule- batur, limine curiae parietibusque discreverim, ne quam in speciem ambitionis inciderem, nunc eos etiam, ad quos ex munere nostro nihil pertinet praeter exemplum, velut obvia ostentatione conqui- ' non meruit Fpra, Otto, Miiller, non ovi. Glory ought to be the consequence, not the motive of our actions ; and though it should sometimes happen not to attend the worthy deed, yet such a deed is none the less amiable for having missed the applause it deserved.

But the world is apt to suspect that those who celebrate their own generous acts, do not extol them because they performed them, but i er- formed them that they might have the pleasure of extolling them. Thus the splendour of an action which would have shone out in full lustre if related by another, vanishes and dies away when he that did it tells the tale. Such is the disposition of mankind, if they cannot blast an action, they will censure the parade of it ; and whether you do what does not deserve to be taken notice of, or take notice your- self of what does, either way you incur reproach.

Habes cunctationis meae causas ; obsequar tamen consilio tuo, cuius mihi auctoritas pro ratione sufficit. Nam, si quern interroges, ' Hodie quid egisti? Tunc enim subit re- "cordatTo: 'Quot dies quam frigidis rebus absumpsi! The " coming-of- age " ceremonies included a sacrifice to the household Lares, a family procession to the Forum, and a sacrifice offered in the Capitol. These are the scruples which have occasioned my delaying to give this piece to the public ; but I submit them entirely to your judgement, which I shall ever esteem as a sufficient reason for my conduct.

Ask anyone how he has been employed to-day? Then one is aj tto reflect. How many days have I spent on trifles! At least it is a reflection which frequently comes across me at Laurentum, after I have been employing myself in my studies, or even in the necessary care of the animal machine for the body must be repaired and supported, if we would preserve the mind in all its vigour. In that peaceful retreat, I neither hear nor speak anything of which I have occasion to repent. O rectam sinceramque vitam! O mare, o litus, verum secretumque fiov- ai7ov, quam multa invenitis, quam multa dictatis!

Proinde tu quoque strepitum istum inanemque dis- cursum et multum ineptos labores, ut primum fuerit occasio, relinque teque studiis vel otio trade. Satius est enim, ut Atilius noster eruditissime simul et facetissime dixit, otiosum esse quam nihil agere. Si quando urbs nostra liberalibus studiis floruitj nunc maxime floret. Multa claraque exempla sunt ; sufficeret unum, Euphrates philosophus. Est enim obvius et expositus plenusque humanitate, quam praecipit. Atque utinam sic ipse, quam spem tunc ille de me concepit, impleverim, ut ille multum virtutibus suis addidit!

When aged and infirm, he committed suicide, agreeably to Stoic principles A. Tliere I live undisturbed by rumour, and free from the anxious solicitudes of hope or fear, conversing only with myself and my books. True and genuine life! More, perhaps, to be desired than the noblest employments! X To Attius Clemens If ever polite literature flourished at Rome, it certainly does now, of which I could give you many eminent instances : I will content myself however with naming only Euphrates the philosopher.

I should think myself exti'emely happy if I had as much answered the expectations he at that time conceived of me, as he has increased his own excellen- cies. Ut enim de pictore, scalptore, fictore nisi artifcx iudicare, ita nisi sapiens non potest perspicere sapientem. Disputat subtiliter, graviter, ornate, frequenter etiam -Platonicam illam sublimitatem et latitudinem etfingit. Sermo est copiosus et varius, dulcis in primis, et qui repugnantes quoque ducat, impellat. Ad hoc proceritas corporis, decora facies, demissus capillus, ingens et cana bai-ba ; quae licet fortuita et inania putentur, illi tamen plurimum venerationis adquirunt.

Sequaris monentem attentus et pendens et persuaderi tibi, etiam cum persuaserit, cupias. Socer Pompeius lulianus cum cetera vita tum vel hoc uno magnus et clarus, quod " Otherwise unknown. X do not fully understand them yet. For as none but those who are skilled in Painting, Statuary, or the plastic art, can form a right judgement of any master in those arts; so a man must himself have made great advances in philosophy, before he is capable of forming a just notion of a pliilosopher.

He reasons with much force, penetration, and elegance, and frequently embodies all the sublime and luxuriant eloquence of Plato. His style is rich and various, and at the same time so wonderfully sweet, that it seduces the attention of the most unwilling hearer. His outward appearance is agreeable to all the rest : he has a tall figure, a comely aspect, long hair, and a large white beard : circumstances which though they may probably be thought trifling and accidental, contribute however to gain him much reverence.

There is no uncouth- ngss in his manner, which is grave, but not austere ;. He points his eloquence against the vices, not the persons of mankiiid, and without chastising reclaims the wanderer. His exhortations so captivate your attention, that you hang as it were upon his hps ; and even after the heart is convinced, the ear still wishes to listen to the harmonious reasoner. His family consists of three children two of which are sons whom he educates with the utmost care.

Soleo nonnumquam nam id ipsum quando contingit! Ille me consolatur, adfinnat etiam esse banc philosophiae et quidem pulcherrimam partem, agere negotium pub- licum, cognoscere, iudicare, promere et exercere iustitiam, quaeque ipsi doceant, in usu habere. Mihi tamen hoc unum non persuadet, satius esse ista facere quam cum illo dies totos audiendo discendoque consumere. Quo magis te, cui vacat, hortor, cum in urbem proxime veneris venias autem ob hoc matu- rius , illi te expoliendum limandumque permittas.

X so particularly in this, that though he was himself a leading personage in his province, yet among many prospective sons-in-law of the highest rank, he chose the first in wisdom, though not in dignity. But to dwell any longer upon the virtues of a man, whose conversation 1 am so unfortunate as not to have leisure to enjoy, what would it avail but to increase my uneasiness that I cannot enjoy it? I sometimes complain to Euphrates for how seldom have I leisure even for that! He endea-. It may be so : but that it is as agreeable as to spend whole days in attending to his instructive conversation — on this one point he will never be able to convince me.

I all the more strongly recommend it to you, who have leisure, the next time you come to Rome and you will come, I dare say, so much the sooner to take the benefit of his elegant and refined instructions. I am not, you see, in the number of those who envy others the happiness they cannot share themselves : on the contrary, it is a vei-y sensible pleasure to me, when I find my friends abounding in enjoyments from which I have the misfortune to be excluded. Olim nullas milii epistulas mittis. Ludere me putas? Fac sciam, quid agas, quod sine soUicitudine summa nescire non possum.

XII C. Plinius Calestrio Tironi Suo S. Iacturam gravissimam feci, si iactura dicenda est tanti viri amissio. Decessit Corellius Rufus et quidem sponte, quod dolorem meum exulcerat.

Closing Thoughts

Est enim luctuosissinium genus mortis, quae non ex natura nee fatalis videtur. Nam utcunque in illis, qui morbo finiuntur, magnum ex ipsa necessitate solatium est, in iis vero, quos arcessita mors aufert, hie in- sanabilis dolor est, quod creduntur potuisse diu vivere.

You will allege, perhaps, you have nothing to write : but let me have the satisfaction at least of seeing it under your hand, or tell me merely in the good old style of exordium, " If you are well, I am so. You may possibly think I jest : but believe me I am extremely in earnest. Let me know how it is with you ; for I cannot be ignorant of that, without the utmost anxiety. Corellius Rufus is dead!

It affords much consolation in the loss of those friends whom disease snatches from us, that they fall by the inevitable fate of man- kind : but those who destroy themselves leave us under the inconsolable reflection that they had it in their power to have lived long.

Sed tam longa, tarn iniqua valetudine conflictabatur, ut haoc tanta pretia vivendi mortis rationibus vincerentur. Tertio et tricensimo anno, ut ipsum audiebam, pedum dolore correptus est. Patrius hie illi; nam plerumque morbi quoque per successiones quasdam ut alia traduntur. Veni ad eum Domitiani temporibus in suburbano iacen- tem.

Servi e cubiculo recesserunt ; habebat enim hoc moriSj quotiens intrasset fidelior amicus ; quin etiam uxor quamquam omnis secreti capacissima digrediebatur. Still it must be owned he had the highest reason which to a wise man will always have the force of necessity to determine him in this resolution. He had long laboured under so tedious and painful a distemper, that even these blessings, great and valuable as they are, could not balance his induce- ments to die.

In his thirty-third year as I have frequently heard him say he was seized with the gout in his feet. This he received from his father; for diseases, as well as possessions, are oftentimes transmitted by a kind of inheritance. A life of abstinence and virtue had something broke the force of this distemper while he had strength and youth to struggle with it ; as a manly courage supported him under the increasing weight of it in his old age though suffering the most incredible and cruel tortures, since the gout by then was not only in his feet, but had spread itself over his whole body. In the reign of Domitian, I made him a visit at his country-house, where I found him lying sick.

As soon as I entered his chamber, his servants withdrew : for such was his constant rule when any very intimate friend was with him : he even earned it so far as to dismiss his wife upon such occasions, though worthy of the highest confidence. Adfuit tamen deus voto, cuius ille compos ut iam securus liberque moriturus multa ilia vitae, sed minora retinacula abrupit.

Increverat valetudo, quam tem- perantia mitigare temptavit ; perseverantem constan- tia fugit. Iam dies alter, tertius, quartus ; abstinebat cibo. Misit ad me uxor eius Hispulla communem amicum C. Geminium cum tristissimo nuntio de- stinasse Corellium mori nee aut suis aut filiae precibus flecti, solum superesse me, a quo revocari posset ad vitam. Perveneram in proximum, cum mihi ab eadem Hispulla lulius Atticus nuntiat nihil iam ne me quidem impetraturum ; tarn obstinate magis ac magis induruisse. Ckjgito, quo amico, quo viro caream. Implevit quidem annum septimum et sexagensimum, quae aetas etiam robustissimis satis longa est ; scio.

Evasit perpetuam " Domitian. Still, Heaven heard his prayer, and having ob- tained it, he broke through those great, but now insufficient attachments to the world, since he could die in possession of security and freedom. His distemper increased ; and as it now grew too violent to admit of any relief from temperance, he resolutely determined to put an end to its un- interrupted attacks by an effort of heroism.

He had I'efused all sustenance for four days, when his wife, Hispulla, sent to me our common friend Geminius, Avith the melancholy news that he was resolved to die ; and that she and her daughter having in vain joined in their most tender persuas- ions to divert him from his purpose, the only hope they had now left was my endeavours to reconcile him to life. I ran to his house with the utmost precipi- tation. As I approached it, I met a second messen- ger from Hispulla, Julius Attius, who informed me tliere was nothing to be hoped for, even from me, as he grew more and more inflexible in his resolution.

What confirmed their fears was an expression he made use of to his physician, who pressed him to take some nourishment : " 'tis resolved," he said : an expres- sion which as it raised my admiration of his greatness of soul, so it does my grief for the loss of him. Mihi tamen hoc unum non persuadet, satius esse ista facere quam cum illo dies totos audiendo discendoque consumere. Quo magis te, cui vacat, hortor, cum in urbem proxime veneris venias autem ob hoc matu- rius , illi te expoliendum limandumque permittas.

X so particularly in this, that though he was himself a leading personage in his province, yet among many prospective sons-in-law of the highest rank, he chose the first in wisdom, though not in dignity. But to dwell any longer upon the virtues of a man, whose conversation 1 am so unfortunate as not to have leisure to enjoy, what would it avail but to increase my uneasiness that I cannot enjoy it? I sometimes complain to Euphrates for how seldom have I leisure even for that!

He endea-. It may be so : but that it is as agreeable as to spend whole days in attending to his instructive conversation — on this one point he will never be able to convince me. I all the more strongly recommend it to you, who have leisure, the next time you come to Rome and you will come, I dare say, so much the sooner to take the benefit of his elegant and refined instructions. I am not, you see, in the number of those who envy others the happiness they cannot share themselves : on the contrary, it is a vei-y sensible pleasure to me, when I find my friends abounding in enjoyments from which I have the misfortune to be excluded.

Olim nullas milii epistulas mittis. Ludere me putas? Fac sciam, quid agas, quod sine soUicitudine summa nescire non possum. XII C. Plinius Calestrio Tironi Suo S. Iacturam gravissimam feci, si iactura dicenda est tanti viri amissio. Decessit Corellius Rufus et quidem sponte, quod dolorem meum exulcerat. Est enim luctuosissinium genus mortis, quae non ex natura nee fatalis videtur.

Nam utcunque in illis, qui morbo finiuntur, magnum ex ipsa necessitate solatium est, in iis vero, quos arcessita mors aufert, hie in- sanabilis dolor est, quod creduntur potuisse diu vivere. You will allege, perhaps, you have nothing to write : but let me have the satisfaction at least of seeing it under your hand, or tell me merely in the good old style of exordium, " If you are well, I am so.

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You may possibly think I jest : but believe me I am extremely in earnest. Let me know how it is with you ; for I cannot be ignorant of that, without the utmost anxiety.

Short Story Tag

Corellius Rufus is dead! It affords much consolation in the loss of those friends whom disease snatches from us, that they fall by the inevitable fate of man- kind : but those who destroy themselves leave us under the inconsolable reflection that they had it in their power to have lived long. Sed tam longa, tarn iniqua valetudine conflictabatur, ut haoc tanta pretia vivendi mortis rationibus vincerentur. Tertio et tricensimo anno, ut ipsum audiebam, pedum dolore correptus est. Patrius hie illi; nam plerumque morbi quoque per successiones quasdam ut alia traduntur.

Veni ad eum Domitiani temporibus in suburbano iacen- tem. Servi e cubiculo recesserunt ; habebat enim hoc moriSj quotiens intrasset fidelior amicus ; quin etiam uxor quamquam omnis secreti capacissima digrediebatur. Still it must be owned he had the highest reason which to a wise man will always have the force of necessity to determine him in this resolution. He had long laboured under so tedious and painful a distemper, that even these blessings, great and valuable as they are, could not balance his induce- ments to die.

In his thirty-third year as I have frequently heard him say he was seized with the gout in his feet. This he received from his father; for diseases, as well as possessions, are oftentimes transmitted by a kind of inheritance. A life of abstinence and virtue had something broke the force of this distemper while he had strength and youth to struggle with it ; as a manly courage supported him under the increasing weight of it in his old age though suffering the most incredible and cruel tortures, since the gout by then was not only in his feet, but had spread itself over his whole body.

In the reign of Domitian, I made him a visit at his country-house, where I found him lying sick. As soon as I entered his chamber, his servants withdrew : for such was his constant rule when any very intimate friend was with him : he even earned it so far as to dismiss his wife upon such occasions, though worthy of the highest confidence.

Adfuit tamen deus voto, cuius ille compos ut iam securus liberque moriturus multa ilia vitae, sed minora retinacula abrupit. Increverat valetudo, quam tem- perantia mitigare temptavit ; perseverantem constan- tia fugit. Iam dies alter, tertius, quartus ; abstinebat cibo. Misit ad me uxor eius Hispulla communem amicum C. Geminium cum tristissimo nuntio de- stinasse Corellium mori nee aut suis aut filiae precibus flecti, solum superesse me, a quo revocari posset ad vitam.

Perveneram in proximum, cum mihi ab eadem Hispulla lulius Atticus nuntiat nihil iam ne me quidem impetraturum ; tarn obstinate magis ac magis induruisse. Ckjgito, quo amico, quo viro caream. Implevit quidem annum septimum et sexagensimum, quae aetas etiam robustissimis satis longa est ; scio. Evasit perpetuam " Domitian. Still, Heaven heard his prayer, and having ob- tained it, he broke through those great, but now insufficient attachments to the world, since he could die in possession of security and freedom.

His distemper increased ; and as it now grew too violent to admit of any relief from temperance, he resolutely determined to put an end to its un- interrupted attacks by an effort of heroism. He had I'efused all sustenance for four days, when his wife, Hispulla, sent to me our common friend Geminius, Avith the melancholy news that he was resolved to die ; and that she and her daughter having in vain joined in their most tender persuas- ions to divert him from his purpose, the only hope they had now left was my endeavours to reconcile him to life.

I ran to his house with the utmost precipi- tation. As I approached it, I met a second messen- ger from Hispulla, Julius Attius, who informed me tliere was nothing to be hoped for, even from me, as he grew more and more inflexible in his resolution. What confirmed their fears was an expression he made use of to his physician, who pressed him to take some nourishment : " 'tis resolved," he said : an expres- sion which as it raised my admiration of his greatness of soul, so it does my grief for the loss of him. I am every moment reflecting what a valuable friend, what an excellent man I am deprived of.

Decessit superstitibus suis, floren- te republica, quae illi omnibus suis carior erat ; et hoc scio. Ego tamen tamquain et iuvenis et firmis- simi mortem doleOj doleo autem licet me imbecillum putes meo nomine. Amisi enim, amisi vitae meae te- stem, rectorem, magistrum. In summa dicam, quod recenti dolore contubernali meo Calvisio dixi : ' Ve- reor, ne neglegentius vivam. Nam, quae audivi, quae legi, sponte succurrunt, sed tanto dolore super- antur. XIII C. Plinius Sosio Senecioni Suo S. Magnum proventum poetarum annus hie attu- lit ; toto mense Aprili nullus fere dies, quo non recitaret aliquis.

Still I cannot forbear to weep for him as if he had been in the prime and vigour of his days : and I weep shall I own my weakness? For I have lost, oh! I have lost the witness, the guide, and the director of my life! In fine, I confess to you what I did to my friend Calvisius in the first transport of my grief — I sadly fear, now that I am no longer under his eye, I shall not keep so strict a guard over my conduct. Speak comfort to me therefore, I entreat you ; not by telling me that " he was old, that he was infirm " ; all this I know ; but by supply- ing me with some arguments that are uncommon and resistless, tliat neither the writings nor the discourses of the philosophers can teach me.

For all that I have heard and all that I have read occur to me of themselves ; but all these are by far too weak to support me under so heavy an affliction. XIII To Sosius Senecio This year has proved extremely fertile in poetical productions ; during the whole month of April, scarce a day has passed wherein we have not been entertained with the recital of some poem.

It is a pleasure to me to find, notwithstanding there seems to be so little disposition in the public to attend assemblies of this kind, that literary pursuits still flourish, and men of genius are not discouraged from producing their perfonnances. The greater part of 45 THE LETTERS OF PLINY sedent tempiisque nudieudi fabulis conterunt ac subinde sil i nuntiari iubent, an iam recitator intra- verit, an dixerit praefationem, an ex magna parte evolverit librum ; turn demum ac tunc quoque lente cunctanterque veniunt nee taiaien permanent, sed ante finem recedunt, alii dissimulanter et furtim, alii simpliciter et libere.

At hercule memoria parentum Claudium Caesarem ferunt, cum in Palatio spatiaretur audissetque clamorem, causam requisissCj eumque dictum esset recitare Nonianum, subitum recitanti inopinatumque venisse. Nunc otiosissimus quisque multo ante rogatus et identidem admonitus aut non venit aut, si venit, queritur se diem, quia non perdi- derit, perdidisse.

Sed tanto magis laudandi proban- dique sunt, quos a scribendi recitandique studio haec auditorum vel desidia vel superbia non retardat. Equidem prope nemini defui. Erant sane plerique amici ; neque enim quisquam est fere, qui studia, ut non simul et nos amet. His ex causis longius, quam destinaveram, tempus in urbe consumpsi.

Possum iam repetere secessum et scribere aliquid, quod non recitem, ne videar, quorum recitationibus adfui, non 46 BOOK I. Not till then, and even then with the utmost deliberation, they just look in, and withdraw again before the end, some by stealth, and others without ceremony. I It was not thus in the time of our ancestors. But now, were one to bespeak the company even of the most idle man living, and remind him of the appointment ever so often, or ever so long before- hand, either he would avoid it, or, if not, would complain of having lost a day ; and for no other reason, but because he had not lost it.

So much the rather do those authors deserve our en- couragement and applause, who have resolution to pei'severe in their studies, and exhibit their per- formances, notwithstanding this indolence or pi'ide of their audience. For my own part, I scarce ever refuse to be present upon such occasions. Though, to say truth, the authors have generally been my friends ; as indeed there are few friends of learning who are not. It is this has kept me in town longer than I intended. I am now however at liberty to withdraw to my retirement, and write something myself: but without any intentions of reciting in my turn.

Nam ut in ceteris rebus ita in audiendi officio perit gratia, si reposcatur. XIV C.


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Plinius Iunio Maurico Suo S. Petis, ut fratris tui filiae prospiciam maritum ; quod merito mihi potissimum iniungis. Scis enim, quantopere summum ilium virum suspexerim dilexe- rimque, quibus ille adulescentiam meam exhortationi- bus foverit, quibus etiam laudibus, ut laudandus vi- derer, effecerit. Nihil est, quod a te mandari mihi aut maius aut gratius, nihil, quod honestius a me suscipi possitj quam ut eligam iuvenem, ex quo nasci nepotes Aruleno Rustico deceat.

Qui quideni diu quaerendus fuisset, nisi paratus et quasi provisus esset Minicius Acilianus, qui me ut iuvenis iuvenem est enim minor pauculis annis familiarissime diligit, reveretur ut senem. Nam ita a me formari et iustitui cupit, ut ego a vobis solebam. Patria est ei Brixia ex ilia nostra Italia, quae multum adhuc verecundiae, frugalitatis atque etiam rusticitatis antiquae retinet ac servat. XIV To Junius Mauricus You desire me to look out a husband for your niece ; and it is with justice you enjoin me that office.

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You were a witness to the esteem and affection I bore that great man her father, and with what noble instructions he formed my youth, and taught me to deserve those praises he was pleased to bestow upon me. You could not give me then a more important, or more agreeable commission, nor could I be employed in an office of higher honour, than of choosing a young man worthy of continuing the family of Rusticus Arulenus : a choice I should be long in determining if I were not acquainted with Minicius Acilianus, who seems formed for our purpose.

While he loves me with that warmth of affection which is usual between young men of equal years as indeed I have the advance of him but by very few he revei'cs me at the same time with all the deference due to age ; and is as desirous to model himself by my instructions, as I was by those of yourself and your brother.

He is a native of Brixia, a city of that Italy we both love, the Italy which still retains much of the sobriety, the frugality — ay, and the rustic plainness — of ancient manners. He is son to Minicius Macrinus, whose humble desires were satisfied with being first in the rank of the Equesti'ian order : for 49 VOU I. Habet aviam maternam Serranam Proculam e municipio Patavino. Nosti loci mores ; Serrana tamen Patavinis quoque severitatis exemplum est.

Contigit et avunculus ei P. Acilius gravitate, pru- dentia, fide prope singular!. In summa nihil erit in domo tota, quod non tibi tanquam in tua placeat. Quaesturam, tribunatum, praeturam honestissime percucurrit ac iam pro se tibi necessitatem ambiendi remisit. Est illi facies liberalis multo sanguine, muJto rubore sufFusa, est ingenua totius corporis pulchritudo et quidam senatorius decor. Quae ego nequaquam arbitror neglegenda ; debet enim hoc castitati puel- larum quasi praemium daii.

Nescio, an adiciam esse patri eius amplas facultates. Nam, cum imaginor vos, qufljus quae- rimus generum, silendum de facultatibus puto ; cum publicos mores atque etiam leges civitatis intueor, quae vel in primis census hominum spec- tandos arbitrantur, ne id quidem praetereundum videtur. His grandmother on the mother's side is Serrana Procula, of Padua : you are ""no stranger to the manners of that place ; yet Ser- rana is looked upon, even among these reserved people, as an exemplary instance of strict virtue.

Acilius, his uncle, is a man of singular gravity, wisdom, and integrity. In a word, you will find nothing throughout his family but what you would approve in your own. Minicius himself has great vivacity, as well as application, joined at the same time with a most amiable and becoming modesty. He has already, with much credit, passed through the offices of Quaes- tor, Tribune, and Praetor, so that you will be spared the trouble of soliciting for him those honourable employments.

He has a genteel and ruddy coun- tenance, with a certain noble mien tliat speaks the man of distinction : advantages, I think, by no means to be slighted, since I look upon them as the proper tribute to vii-gin innocence. I am doubtful whether I should add that his father is very rich. When I consider the character of those who require a husband of my choosing, I feel it is unnecessary to mention wealth ; but when I reflect upon the prevailing manners of the age, and even the laws of Rome, which rank a man according to his possessions, it certainly claims some notice : and indeed in choosing a match, where a perhaps numerous progeny are to be considered, it is an article that well deserves to be taken into the account.

At ego fide mea spondeo futurum ut omnia longe ampliora, quam a me praedicantur, invenias. Diligo quidem adulescentem ardentissime, sicut meretur; sed hoc ipsum amautis est, nou onerare eum laudibus. Vale XV C. Plinius Septicio Claro Suo S. Heus tu! Dicitnr ius ; ad assem impendium reddes nee id modicum. Paratae erant lactucae singulae, cochleae teniae, ova bina, halica cum mulso et nive nam banc quoque computabi;s, immo banc in j vimis, quae perit in ferculo , olivae, betacei, cucurbitae, bulbi, alia mille non minus lauta.

Audisses comoedum vel lectorem vel lyristen vel, quae mea liberalitas, omnes. At tu apud nescio quern ostrea, vulvas, echinos, Gaditanas maluisti. Dabis poenas, non dico quas. But I will stake all my credit, you will find every thing far beyond what I have represented. I confess, indeed, I love Minicius as he justly deserves with all the warmth of the most ardent affection ; but for that very reason I would not overload him with en- comiums. XV To Septicius Clarus How happened it, my friend, that you did not keep your engagement the other night to sup with me?

Now take notice, the court is sitting, and you shall fully reimburse me the expense I was at to treat you — which, let me tell you, was no small sum. I had prepared, you must know, a lettuce and three snails apiece ; with two eggs, barley-water, some sweet wine and snow the snow most certainly I shall charge to your account, and at a high rate, as 'twas spoiled in serving.

Besides all these curious dishes, there were olives, beets, gourds, shalots, and a hundred other dainties equally sump- tuous. You should likewise have been entertained either with an interlude, the rehearsal of a poem, or a piece of music, as you like best ; or such was my liberality with all three.

But the oysters, oliitter- lings, sea-urchins and Spanish dancers of a certain I know not who, were, it seems, more to your taste. Quantum nos lusissemus, risissenius, studuissemus Potes apparatius cocnare apud multos, nusquam hilai-ius, simplicius, incautius. In summa experire et, nisi postea te aliis potius excusaveris, mihi semper excusa. XVI C. PuNius Erucio Suo S. Amabam Pompeium Saturninum, hunc dico nostrum, laudabamque eius ingenium, etiam antequam scirem, quam varium, quam flexibile, quam multiplex esset : nunc vero totum me tenet, habet, possidet.

Audivi causas agentem acriter et ardenter, nee minus polite et ornate, sive nieditata sive subita proferret. Adsunt aptae crebraeque sententiae, gravis et decora constructio, sonantia verba et antiqua. Omnia haec mire placent, cum impetu quodam et flumine praeve- luintur, placent, si retractentur. Senties quod ego, cum orationes eius in manus siimpseris, quas facile cuilibet veterum, quorum est aemulus, comparabis.

In good truth it was not kind thus to mortify your friend, I had almost said your- self ;— and upon second thoughts I do say so : for how agreeably should we have spent the evening, in laughing, trifling, and instruction! You may sup, 1 confess, at many places more splendidly ; but you can be treated no where, believe me, with more uncon- strained cheerfulness, simplicity and freedom : only make the experiment ; and if you do not ever afterwards prefer my table to any other, never favour me with your company again.

I have heard him in the unpremeditated, as well as studied speech, plead with no less warmth and energy, than grace and eloquence. He abounds with just re- flexions ; his periods are graceful and majestic ; his words resonant with antiquity. Nam in concionibus idem, qui' in oratiouibus suis est ; pressior tamen et circum- scriptior et adductior. Praeterea facit versus, quales Catullus aut Calvus. Quantum illis leporis, dulcedinis, amaritudinis, amoris! Legit mihi nuper epistulas, quas uxoris esse dicebat.

Plautum vel Terentium metro solutum legi credidi.. Quae sive uxoris sunt, ut affirmat, sive ipsius, ut negat, pai'i gloria dignus est, qui aut ilia componat aut uxorem, quam virginem accepit, tarn doctam politam- que reddiderit. Est ergo mecum per diem totum ; eundem, antequam scribam, eundem, cum scripsi, eundem, etiam cum remittor, non tanquam eundem lego. Quod te quoque ut facias et hortor et moneo. Neque enim debet operibus eius obesse, quod vivit. An, si inter eos, quos nunquam vidimus, floruisset, non solum libros eius, verum etiam im- " i.

But these are not all his ex- cellencies ; he has composed several poetical pieces in the manner of Catullus or of Calvus. What strokes of wit, what sweetness of numbers, what pointed satire, and what touches of the tender passion appear in his verses!

He sometimes, but designedly, in- troduces harsher notes into his smooth and flowing numbers, in imitation too of those admired poets. He read to me, the other day, some letters which he assured me were written by his wife : I fancied I was hearing Plautus or Terence in prose. His works are never out of my hands ; and whether I sit down to write any thing myself, or to revise what I have already written, or am in a disposition to amuse myself, I constantly take up this same author ; and, as often as I do so, he is still new.

Let me strongly recommend him to the same degree of intimacy with you ; nor be it any prejudice to his merit that he is a contemporary writer. At hoc pravum malignumque est, non admirari hominem admiratione dignissimum, quia videre, adloqui, audire, complecti nee laudare tantum, verum etiam amare contingit. Plinius Cornelio Titiano Suo S. Est adhuc curae hominibus fides et officium, sunt, qui defunctorum quoque amicos agant. Titinius Capito ab imi eratore nostro impetravit, ut sibi liceret statuam L.

Silani in foro ponere. Pulchrum et magna laude dignum amicitia principis in hoc uti, quantum- que gratia valeas, aliorum honoribus experiri. Est omnino Capitoni in usu claros viros col ere ; mirum est, qua religione, quo studio imagines Brutorum, Cassioruui, Catonum domi, ubi potest, habeat. Idem clarissimi cuiusque vitam egregiis carminibus exornat.

Scias ipsum plurimis virtutibus abundare, qui alienas sic amat. Redditus est L. XVII To Cornelius Titianus The social virtues have not yet quite forsaken the world ; and there are still those whose generous affection extends itself even to their departed friends. Titinius Capito has obtained the Emperor's per- mission to erect a statue in the Forum to the late L. It is noble and truly laudable to use princely favour for purposes such as thesCj and to try the extent of one's interest for the gfory of others. It is indeed habitual to Capito to distinguish merit.

He has placed in his house where he is at liberty to do so the statues of the Bruti, the Cassii, and the Catos, and it is incredible what a religious veneration he pays them. This is not all : there is scarce a name of any note or lustre that he has not celebrated by his excellent verses. One may be very sure a man must be possessed of manifold virtues himself, who thus admires those of others. Neque enim magis decorum et insigne est statuam in foro populi Romani habere quam ponere. Plinius Suetonio Tranquillo Suo S. ScRiBis te pertemtum somnio vereri, ne quid adversi in actione patiaris, rogas, ut dilationem petam et pauculos dies, certe proximunij excusem.

Refert tamen, eventura soleas an contraria somniare. Mihi reputanti somnium nieum istud, quod times tu, egregiam actionem povtendere videtur. Susceperam causam luni Pastoris, cum mihi quiescenti visa est socrus mea advoluta genibus, ne agerem, obsecrare. See i. This is a favour, you are sensible, not very easily obtained, but I will use all my interest for that purpose ; " For dreams descend from Jove.

But if. I may judge of this dream that alarms you by one that happened to myself, it portends you will acquit yourself with great success. I had promised to be counsel for Junius Pastor ; when I fancied in my sleep that my mother-in-law came to me, and throwing herself at my feet, earnestly entreated me not to be concerned in the cause. Prospere cessit, atque adeo ilia actio mihi aures hominmB, ilia ianuam famae patefecit.

Est enim sane alia ratio tua, alia mea fuit. XIX C. MuNicEPS tu nieus et condiscipulus et ab ineunte aetate contubernalis, pater tuus et matri et avunculo meOj mihi etiam, quantum aetatis diversitas passa est, 1 The event happened as I wished ; and it was that very speech which first procured me the favourable attention of the public, and threw open to me the gates of Fame. Consider then whether your dream, judged by this precedent, may not por- tend success.

Or, if you think it more safe to pursue that maxim of the wary: "never do a thing of which you are in doubt " : write me word. In the interval I will consider of some exixedient, and endeavour your cause shall be heard any day you like best. In this respect you are in a better situation than I was : the court of the Centumviri where I was to plead admits of no adjournment ; whereas in that where your cause is to be heard, though it is not easy to procure one, still however it is possible. Esse autem tibi centum milium censum satis indicat, quod apud nos decurio es.

Igitur, ut te non decurione solum, verum etiam equite Romano perfruamur, offero tibi ad im- plendas equestres facultates trecenta milia nummum. Te memorem huius muneris amicitiae nostrae diu- turnitas spondet ; ego ne illud quidem admoneo, quod admonere deberem, nisi te scirem sponte facturum, ut dignitate a me data quam modestissime ut a me data utare. Nam sollicitius custodiendus est honor, in quo etiam beneficium amici tuendum est. Plinius Cornelio Tacito Sue S. Frequens mihi disputatio est cum quodam docto liomine et perito, cui nihil aeque in causis agendis, ut brevitas, placet.

Quam ego custodiendam esse confiteor, si causa pevmittat ; alioqui praevaricatio est transire dicenda, praevaricatio etiam cursim et breviter attingere, quae sint inculcanda, infigenda, repetenda. The length of our friendship leaves me no room to doubt you will ever be forgetful of this service. And I need not advise you what if I did not know your disposition, I should to enjoy this honour with the modesty that becomes one who received it from me ; for the dignity Ave possess by the good offices of a friend is to be guarded with peculiar attention, since we must thereby justify his kindness.

XX To Cornelius Tacitus I HAVE frequent debates with a learned and judi- cious person of my acquaintance, who admires nothing so much in the eloquence of the bar as conciseness. I admit, where the cause will admit of this manner, it ought to be pursued ; but insist, that to omit what is material to be mentioned, or only slightly to touch upon those points which should be repeatedly inculcated, and urged home to the minds of the audience, is, in effect, to betray the cause one has the senators and the common people, but without other dis- tinction than the privilege of wearing a gold ring, the badge of their order.

Et hercule ut aliae bonae res ita bonus liber melior est quisque quo maior. Vides, ut statuas, signa, picturas, hominum denique multorumque animaliuni formas, arborum etiam, si modo sint decorae, nihil magis quam amplitude commendet. Idem orationibus evenitj quin etiam voluminibus ipsis auctoritatem quandam et pulchritudinem adicit magnitudo. Haec ille multaque alia, quae a me in eandem sententiam solent dici, ut est in disputando incom- prehensibilis et lubricus, ita eludit, ut contendat hos ipsos, quorum orationibus nitar, pauciora dixisse, quam ediderint. Ego contra puto. Testes sunt multae multorum orationes et Ciceronis pro Murena, pro Vareno, in quibus brevis et nuda quasi subscriptio quorundam criminum solis titulis indicatur.

It was later used also of collusion with the prosecution by defendant's counsel. XX undertaken. In answer t6 this he usually has recourse to authorities ; and produces Lysias amongst the Grecians, and Cato and tlie two Gracchi among our own countrymen, whose speeches certainly afford many instances of the concise style. It is in good compo- sitions, as in every thing else that is valuable ; the more there is of them, the better. You may observe in statues, basso-relievos, pictures, and the bodies of men and animals, and even in trees, that nothing is more graceful than magnitude, if accom- panied with proportion.

The same holds true in speeches ; and even in books, a large volume carries something of beauty and authority in its very size. My antagonist, who is extremely dexterous at evading an argument, eludes all tliis, and much more which I usually urge to the same purpose, by insisting that those very persons, upon whose works I found my opinion, made considerable additions to their orations when they published tliem.

This I deny : and appeal to the harangues of numbei'less orators; particularly to those of Cicero for Murena and Varenus, where he has given us merely the titles of certain cut-and-dried counts in the indictment. Idem pro Cluentio ait se totam causam veteri in- stitute solum perorasse et pro Cornelio quatriduo egisse, ne dubitare possimus, quae per plures dies, ut necesse erat, latius dixerit, postea recisa ac purgata in unum librum grandem quidem, unum tamen coartasse.

Est enim oratio actionis exemplar, et quasi apyirvTTQv. Ideo in optima quaque mille figuras extemporales invenimus, in lis etiam, quas tantum editas scimus, ut in Verrem : ' Artificem queni? Cicero's two speeches for him are lost, except a few fragments. XX enlarged upon at the time he delivered those orations, were retrenched when he gave them to the public. But, it is objected, there is a wide difference between a good sjmken and a good writteii oration. This opinion I acknowledge, has had some favourers; nevertheless I am persuaded though I may perhaps be mistaken that it is possible a speech may be well received by the audience, which has not merit enough to recom- mend it to the reader ; but an oration which is good on paper cannot be bad when delivered ; for the oration on paper is, in truth, the original and model of the speech that is to be pronounced.

Frequenter egi, frequenter iudicavi, frequenter in consilio fui. Aliud alios movet, ac plerumque parvae res maximas trahunt. Varia sunt hominum iudicia, variae volun- tates. Praeterea suae quisque inventioni favet et quasi fortissimum complectitur, cum ab alio dictum est, quod ipse praevidit. Omnibus ergo dandum est aliquid, quod teneant, quod agnoscant.

Dixit aliquando mihi ReguluSj cum simul adessemus : ' Tu omnia, quae sunt in causa, putas exsequenda, ego iugulum statim video, hunc premo. The sense of the laws is, I am sure, on my side, which are by no means chary of the orator's time ; it is not brevity, but fulness, in other words, attention to everything material, which they recommend. And how is it possible for an advocate to acquit himself of that duty, unless in the most simple causes, if he affects to be concise? Let me add what experience, that superlative master, has taught me ; it has frequently been my province to act as an advocate and as juror, I have often sat as an assessor, and I have ever found that different minds are to be influenced by different applications ; and that the slightest circum- stances often entail the most important consequences.

There is variety in the dispositions and under- standings of men, so that they seldom agree in their opinions about any one point in debate before them ; or, if they do, it is generally from the movement of diff'erent passions. Besides, every man naturally favours his own discoveries, and when he hears an argument made use of which had before occurred to himself, will certainly embrace it as extremely convincing ; the orator therefore should so adapt himself to his audience as to throw out something to every one of them, that he may receive and approve as his own peculiar thought.

Once when Regulus and I were counsel together in a cause, he said to me, " you think it necessary to insist upon every point : whereas I mark at once the throat, and closely press that. Neque enim minus in- perspicua, incerta, fellaciaque sunt iudicum ingenia quam tempestatum terrarumque. Nam delectare, persuadere copiam dicendi spatiumque desidei'at ; relinquere vero aculeum in audientium animis is demum potest, qui non pungit, sed infigit.

XX might possibly happen that what he took for the throat was in reality the knee, shin, or heel. I remember the comic writer Eupolis mentions in praise of that excellent orator Pericles, that "He spake, and straight Upon his lips Persuasion sate ; He only eloquence could find That charmed, yet left a sting behind.

Again, another comic poet, speaking of the same oratoi-, says : "Lightnings and thunders from his mouth he hurled. And made a chaos of the Grecian world. Itaque audis frequenter ut illud : ' immodice et redundanter' ita hoc: ' ieiune et infirme. Aeque uterque, sed ille imbecillitate, hie viribus peccat ; quod certe, etsi non liniatioris, maioris tamen ingenii vitium est. The just mean, we all allow, is best ; but he equally deviates from that mean who falls short of it, as he who goes beyond it ; he who confines himself in too narrow a compass, as he who launches out with too great latitude of speech.